Historical Tidbit: Amelia Earhart & Eleanor Roosevelt

April 1933:  Amelia Earhart attended a black tie at the White House.  After dinner, Amelia and Eleanor Roosevelt took a midnight flight from Washington to Baltimore — in their formal attire.  Eleanor wanted to take flying lessons from Amelia, but the President vetoed the request.

Amelia Earhart (left) and Eleanor Roosevelt (right). Photo retrieved from history.com.

Amelia Earhart (left) and Eleanor Roosevelt (right). Photo retrieved from history.com.

Historical Tidbit: John Quincy Adams’s Pet Alligator

Historical Tidbit: John Quincy Adams, the 6th U.S. president (1825 to 1829), kept a pet alligator at the White House during his presidency.

John Quincy Adams by George Caleb Bingham, c. 1850 after 1844 original. Exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC, USA.

John Quincy Adams by George Caleb Bingham, c. 1850 after 1844 original. Exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC, USA.

Historical Tidbit: Prostitution in Ancient Greece

Historical Tidbit:  The hetairai of ancient Greece were professional courtesans who possessed intelligence, beauty, and sophistication. They charged their elite male clientele high fees, making them the only group of economically independent women.  Even though they were viewed as prostitutes, the hetairai had much more freedom in Greek society than the common woman.Godward-Nerissa-1906

 

Historical Tidbit: Animals Tried in Courts of Law

Historical Tidbit:  Animals were formally tried in court as defendants during the Middle Ages in Europe.  French lawyer Bartholomé Chassenée was appointed to represent felonious rats that destroyed barley in the 1500s.  He was able to persuade the judge that it was a danger for his clients to appear in court due to the amount of cats in the area.  It’s unclear how the case was settled.

Royal 10 E.IV, f.48v