Villanelle Poem: Uncharted Escape

I’m in need of an uncharted escape,
One that sets my heart ablaze like wildfire;Uncharted Escape
I pray for a new journey to take shape.

Ready to let go, make a new mix tape;
Ready to walk across a live wire.
I’m in need of an uncharted escape.

Fly high and wear a Wonder Woman cape;
Fly to France or wherever I desire.
I pray for a new journey to take shape.

A heart as heavy as a velvet drape;
A heart deflated like a flat tire;
I’m in need of an uncharted escape.

Every day brings a new bruise or a scrape;
Yet every day could take you higher.
I pray for a new journey to take shape.

I want to drop their jaws, leave mouths agape;
I want to leave my mark and inspire.
I’m in need of an uncharted escape.
I pray for a new journey to take shape.

Learn how to write a villanelle.

photo credit: h.koppdelaney via cc

Villanelle Poem: Lines by K.S. Fause

origin_5011099105I don’t wait in lines and won’t wait for you;
Like stars in the sky, I’ll just disappear.
Memories of you are out of my view.

I know what you’re made of, saw that big clue.
I’ve got a dream to follow, it’s my year.
I don’t wait in lines and won’t wait for you.

Won’t hang my head in shame like I always do;
Won’t remain in one place, frozen in fear.
Memories of you are out of my view.

My heart isn’t something to break into;
Did you think I’d release a single tear?
I don’t wait in lines and won’t wait for you.

You were never the one to carry me through;
Saw through all your lies, let me make that clear.
Memories of you are out of my view.

You’re like an unwanted, aging tattoo;
The one I got from drinking too much beer.
I don’t wait in lines and won’t wait for you.

How to write a villanelle.

photo credit: seyed mostafa zamani via pcc

Villanelle: Stains by K.S. Fause

A serene night’s sleep scrubs away the stains;
A new day awaits your gentle dance,
Pleading to let go of all that remains.1_origin_9306722809

There will always be those dreaded chains,
Most often it is a game of chance;
A night’s serene sleep scrubs away the stains.

Nothing is as bad as colliding trains;
A bruised, battered heart from a bad romance,
Pleading to let go of all that remains.

We are granted the choice to make great gains,
To release the past and make an advance;
A night’s serene sleep will scrub away the stains.

When the heavens open up and it rains,
I find myself slipping into a trance,
And plead to let go of all that remains.

I must turn loose all that hurts and pains;
I must move on and take a new stance.
A night’s serene sleep scrubs away the stains;
Pleading to let go of all that remains.

Note:  See my post on fixed form poetry to learn about sonnets and villanelles.
photo credit: BEYOURPET via cc

Fixed Form Poetry: The Sonnet and The Villanelle

Writing historical fiction is my thing.  I love developing long-forgotten historical characters and their settings for short stories.  I love throwing conflict after conflict at my main characters in my historical novel-in-progress.  But I also love fixed form poetry.  It’s like placing pieces of a jigsaw puzzle together.  The difference is, you have to make the pieces yourself before you put it together.

The Sonnet

The Italian sonnet (or Petrarchan sonnet) treats its theme in two parts:

  1. The octave (8 lines) — states a problem, poses a question, or shows emotional tension.  The rhyme scheme is abba abba.
  2. The sestet (6 lines) — resolves the problem, answers the question, relieves the tension.  The rhyme scheme can vary:  cde cde, cde, dec, or cde dce.

The English (or Elizabethan sonnet) is composed of three rhymed quatrains (12 lines) and end with a rhymed couplet (2 lines).  The rhyme scheme for the English sonnet is abab cdcd efef gg.

Both the Italian and English sonnets consist of a total of 14 lines and 10 syllables per line.  I adhere to the 14 lines for each form, but my lines sometimes fluctuate between 9 and 11 syllables.

Example English sonnet:  The Scribbler

The Villanelle

The villanelle is a French verse consisting of five tercets (15 lines) and a quatrain (4 lines), making for a total of 19 lines.  The rhyme scheme is:  aba aba aba aba aba abaa.  There is no set number of syllables per line for the villanelle, but it’s usually between 8 and 11 syllables.

The key to the villanelle is that the first and third lines of the first tercet are repeated throughout the poem.  The first line is repeated as the last line of the second and fourth tercet and as the third line of the final quatrain.  The third line is repeated as the last line of the third and fifth tercet and as the last line of the final quatrain.

Example villanelle:  Uncharted Escape